Vaporizer

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Double Mountain of Hood River has added Vaprorizer to its regular line-up, joining their Kölsch, India Red Ale, and Hop Lava NW IPA. Vaporizer was a seasonal last summer, and it must have passed the test to graduate a level.

It is a Pale Ale which features hops primarily of the Challenger variety, grown on a single farm in the Yakima Valley and Gambrinus malt. Brewmaster Matt Swihart and his crew dry-hop Vaporizer to amp up the hop. It is 6.0% alcohol by volume with 50 bittering units.

St. Lupulin

It’s early June and the summer beers keep a comin’. That is good news because here in Los Angeles it is almost always summer and we could use as many actual pale ales as we can get.

So here is another option from Odell’s in Colorado.
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Farmer’s Tan

Beer labels are artwork in my opinion and this one from Southern Tier is even better than their Christmas Krampus…
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It is for a new pale ale from the New York brewery that they dedicate to “… our farmer friends of today for cultivating the ingredients the are responsible for the beers we now enjoy. Their laborious days spent ourdoors under the hot sun earn them respect, as well as a mark of distinction: the farmer’s tan. Yes, the inevitable red and white hallmark of hard work.”

Whip Ale

Saw this tidbit in NW Brewing News and thought, interesting new trend?

“Lazy Boy Brewing has partnered with Michael Wilton (aka Whip) from the band Queensryche to develop a beer called Whip Ale”

It will be a NW style pale ale. The rocker apparently helped create the recipe.

Whose next?

BJCP – Style Guidelines – Pale Ale

Gonna get a little techy-geeky-wonky on you but this is excellent info from the BJCP website that will help you judge what a typical, solid Pale Ale should be. To check out the other styles go to http://www.bjcp.org/2008styles/catdex.php

10A. American Pale Ale

Aroma: Usually moderate to strong hop aroma from dry hopping or late kettle additions of American hop varieties. A citrusy hop character is very common, but not required. Low to moderate maltiness supports the hop presentation, and may optionally show small amounts of specialty malt character (bready, toasty, biscuity). Fruity esters vary from moderate to none. No diacetyl. Dry hopping (if used) may add grassy notes, although this character should not be excessive.

Appearance: Pale golden to deep amber. Moderately large white to off-white head with good retention. Generally quite clear, although dry-hopped versions may be slightly hazy.

Flavor: Usually a moderate to high hop flavor, often showing a citrusy American hop character (although other hop varieties may be used). Low to moderately high clean malt character supports the hop presentation, and may optionally show small amounts of specialty malt character (bready, toasty, biscuity). The balance is typically towards the late hops and bitterness, but the malt presence can be substantial. Caramel flavors are usually restrained or absent. Fruity esters can be moderate to none. Moderate to high hop bitterness with a medium to dry finish. Hop flavor and bitterness often lingers into the finish. No diacetyl. Dry hopping (if used) may add grassy notes, although this character should not be excessive.

Mouthfeel: Medium-light to medium body. Carbonation moderate to high. Overall smooth finish without astringency often associated with high hopping rates.

Overall Impression: Refreshing and hoppy, yet with sufficient supporting malt.

Comments: There is some overlap in color between American pale ale and American amber ale. The American pale ale will generally be cleaner, have a less caramelly malt profile, less body, and often more finishing hops.

History: An American adaptation of English pale ale, reflecting indigenous ingredients (hops, malt, yeast, and water). Often lighter in color, cleaner in fermentation by-products, and having less caramel flavors than English counterparts.