In the Tap Lines for March 2021

header_attractionsMoving on to the third month of the year with a little more hope in our step.  Vaccines are getting into arms which means we inch ever closer to life pre-pandemic with taster trays and not being forced to purchase meals.  

~ e-visits to (3) breweries known for nitro ales.
~ special featured reviews of beers from The Bruery for the second month in a row!
~Heads-Up on Los Angeles Beer Events (Far in the future events)
~ Three suggested beers to buy this month. One light, one medium and one dark
~ A Book & A Beer reads Awkward Conversations with a Black Man by Emmanuel Acho
~ A Podcast & A Beer listens to No Such Thing as a Fish
~ Great Beer names and Best Beers of the Month
~ I will tap the Firkin and give my no holds barred opinion on the craft beer world.

R.I.P. (for now) Olympia Beer

It might be strange for a SoCal beer blog to be talking about a faded brand from Washington State but trust me, there is a connection and some importance to remembering Olympia beer.

My dad would load up the family into a car that technically had four seats but when you add luggage and the fact that three of us were at the six foot tall mark, it was closer to a clown car. He would drive us all over. But one trip we made quite a bit was to Victoria, Canada and on some maps that meant driving through Olympia which meant you passed by Tumwater and the huge plant that Olympia Beer called home. For me it was a geographical marker. I knew the freeway would swing right soon and endless boring paved miles had a change of scenery.

Now, for the time being, there will be no Olympia beer brewed.

In my later years, Olympia came to be known along with Hamm’s and Henry Weinhard’s as beers for older people. Antiques might be a better name for it since the neon signs and memorabilia was more sought after than the beer.

This was, of course, due to the fact that Olympia was now just a name. A brand. It was passed around like crudités at a dinner party. Going from one corporate entity to the other. Just limping around.

By 2021 the beer was brewed in Irwindale, CA right off the 210 freeway at a massive Miller plant that is now in the hands of what is left of Pabst and it’s blue ribbon. The Tumwater facility is now a distillery producing Vodka. Maybe, in the future it will do beer again too but I think if they do they should let the “brand” die and have a new brewery name (New Olympia Brewing?) and have one of the beers be named “It’s the Water”. Trademarks allowing of course.

In the Tap Lines for February 2021

header_attractionsYes, this here blog is California centered due to my LA living.  But this month, we will kick it up a notch since California Craft Beer Week is taking over the SF Beer Week slot this year. Plus a hush-hush secret beer review is coming too  

~ e-visits to (3) breweries here in California
~ special featured reviews of beers of (4) special beers from The Bruery
~Heads-Up on Los Angeles Beer Events (Far in the future events)
~ Three suggested beers to buy this month. One light, one medium and one dark
~ A Book & A Beer reads Deacon King Kong by James McBride
~ A Podcast & A Beer listens to KingCast
~ Great Beer names and Best Beers of the Month
~ I will tap the Firkin and give my no holds barred opinion on the craft beer world.

Return to Flavor Wheel

I haven’t used a flavor wheel in some time. But I got swagged with one and decided to take up the hobby again to see if it would add nuance to possible future beer reviews. The above photo is the 33 Beers version.

My conclusion after just a few entries is that I would like to see this in the “cloud” as it were. On the page, the info is fine but I can’t really compare anything or sort by rating or by highest toffee count or lowest burnt count. I do not know if an online version exists but it would be really helpful to be able to see what my highest ranking flavor wheel looked like and which beer style it belonged to. That would then lead me to finding beers with approximate flavors.

2020 Beer Drinking Stats

Time to delve into my beer drinking statistics for last year. Frankly, there was not a lot of variance when you are drinking primarily 16oz cans. No tasters, no half pints, no magnums this year. Let’s do the numbers…

Let’s get some basic stats out of the way first. The average ABV over the course of the year was 6.79%. I drank on average just shy of 160 ounces per 5 day week.

Style wise IPA made up 52.85% of the beers. Sour and/or barrel aged a measly 7.6% and the Other category was 39.55%. Next year I might try to add more styles to the mix to see more detailed data.

My top ten most drunk from breweries starts with my favorite Firestone Walker, then to Sierra Nevada and Stone in the next two spots. All three regionals that could be found anywhere one shopped. Local Eagle Rock was fourth leading the LA parade. Followed by Los Angeles Ale Works, Smog City, Angel City, Boomtown and Brewyard. Tied for tenth was Santa Monica Brew Works and The Bruery.

The Yearly BSP Disclaimer for 2021

Each and every year, I start the blogging calendar with a disclaimer. As a beer blogger, I feel it is important to be clear about my rules and morals.

Every beer, brewery, event, restaurant reviewed on this site whether paid for or complimentary will get the same treatment when reviewed. If I don’t like the beer, it will be described as a beer that I did not like, even if it was handed to me by the brewer and I like the brewer.

If I forget, (which probably will happen, because it has before) to mention how I got a beer or a pass to an event, then go back and read the previous paragraph.

I clearly want the Los Angeles local beer scene to continue to flourish and I want craft beer in general to do so as well. So, my reviews will also take that into consideration. Some points in 2021 will require cheerleading (more so this year than the past) and others require harsh sentences. I am not subtle so I am sure you will figure it out quickly.

I will be as impartial and truthful as I can be while also staying as opinionated as usual.

In the Tap Lines for January 2021

header_attractions2021 is here, finally, to save us from 2020.  These early months are going to be tough though.  Congress helped out (for once) and gave breweries permanent tax breaks and maybe the finally released second stimulus will break the negative economic cycle.  

~ e-visits to (3) breweries that I hope to visit this year
~ special featured reviews of holiday seasonals
~Heads-Up on Los Angeles Beer Events (Far in the future events)
~ Three suggested beers to buy this month. One light, one medium and one dark
~ A Book & A Beer reads Interior Chinatown by Charles Yu
~ A Podcast & A Beer listens to the sci-fi fiction of From Now
~ Great Beer names and Best Beers of the Month
~ I will tap the Firkin and give my no holds barred opinion on the craft beer world.

In the Taplines for December 2020

header_attractionsHappy last holiday of 2020!  The rollercoaster year started high and then Covid cases went higher so it is a tough time for breweries so make this a give beer as gifts year.

~ e-visits to more GABF medal winning breweries
~ special featured reviews of holiday seasonals
~Heads-Up on Los Angeles Beer Events (Far in the future events)
~ Three suggested beers to buy this month. One light, one medium and one dark
~ A Book & A Beer reads The Midnight Library by Matt Haig 
~ A Podcast & A Beer listens to The Christmas Podcasts Podcast 
~ Great Beer names and Best Beers of the Month
~ I will tap the Firkin and give my no holds barred opinion on the craft beer world.

Tweaks Complete!

OK, I think I have done enough tinkering with the website for now.

Time to explain the changes…

Instead of a three columned beast, down to two columns with the Cellar inventory appropriately at the very bottom of the page. Hopefully this makes things a skosh prettier to the eye.

I have whittled the other pages down to four and have refreshed those pages with more up-to-date info and images.

Lastly the top o’ the page will now rotate images to liven things up a little.

As always, thanks for stopping by!